PPGR Uses Political “Trojan Horse” in Elections

PPGR Uses Political “Trojan Horse” in Elections

This post is also available in: Greek

In order to exceed the obstacle of the electoral limit of 3% to enter the Parliament, the Greek Pirates took a bold and risky initiative. Their strategic plan was to jointly create a modern political “Trojan Horse” together with other parties and movements. The “Trojan Horse” is in the form of a “big but disposable coalition”, in which all members preserve their ideological and political identities. The aim is obvious: to conquer the Greek Parliament.

The first meeting towards forming this “one-time party” was held on 1 July 2014, at the Cultural Centre of the Municipality of Athens. The meeting was a great success. In total, 15 parties and movements participated by sending representatives (including PPGR) to this historic meeting, unprecedented for Greek politics. The meeting resulted in an agreement to work together in this direction.

All party representatives concluded that there is a strong demand for the abolition of the 3% threshold  through any means (legislatively or politically) and expressed their approval for this coalition that must be built by minimum consensus.

  • Agree to jointly run in the national elections, whenever they are to be held.
  • Each party joins the coalition without losing its ideological identity or independence.
  • The managing authority may include a representative of each party and decisions are to be taken by unanimity only.
  • If a party vetoes a topic, it will be rejected from the agenda.
  • All parties to co-write the structure of the coalition.

These minor parties constitute a majority of the political parties in Greece but remain permanently outside of Parliament because of the 3% threshold. The meeting was not covered  by mainstream media despite invitations from PPGR, only one national newspaper and a tv channel responded to the invitation.

The Plan and How it Started

Thanasis Gounaris, vice chairman of the Board of PP-GR, talked to Pirate Times about the plan and how it started:

“We are now organizing the second meeting! The acceptance of our initiative is growing! This is not a proposal to form a new party, but a ‘one use coalition’. We only discuss how to form a political alliance, something like a modern “Trojan Horse”, aiming to elect the most people we can into the Parliament! Nothing more! Nothing more! We know it’s risky! As risky as  ‘pirates boarding a ship’! We are trying to board our way into power’ because we believe that citizens’ voices have to be heard! But we believe that it is worth it, because we no longer tolerate seeing power to repeatedly stealing our votes! We also believe that our political scene needs to be renewed, both in persons and parties! Democracy in our country needs rescue! And Greek Pirates took the initiative to rescue it, calling other parties to unite and help. Of course we exclude extreme or fascist parties.

The big issue for us is the support of the Greek society to this move. For a country in crisis, the problem is not just economy and unemployment but also the democratic institutions that have been suspended. The parties in power unconstitutionally take decisions that put economy and the prospects of the country in danger.

The votes of citizens are being drowned by a brigandish electoral system that subsidizes the first party with 50 seats! These seats derived from the so-called “small” parties that can not exceed the limit of 3% and therefore remain out of the Parliament. It’s a system that sucks and was enacted by the parties in power to control the majority.

To imagine how incredibly unfair it is, think that in recent euroelections it excluded a 17%, almost 1 million votes that were in favour of 15 “small” parties! On May 2012, in national elections, it was more than 19%! If we take into account the abstention that usually reaches 35% – 40%, then it seems very clear that the majority of Greek society is not represented at all.

Given this situation, the Pirate Party of Greece took the initiative and invited all parties to sit at a common table and discuss about a synergy, without making it necessary for an ideological convergence. The plan of Pirates isn’t about the creation of a new political party but simply aiming at a one-time collaboration. If all the parties of 17% could be in one political alliance that could be voted by the people, then it would lead to the election of at least 50 MPs! That would definitely change the political map of our country!”

Featured image: copyright  kinimadenplirono.eu used by permission

Stathis Leivaditis

About Stathis Leivaditis

The English “pirate” is derived from the Greek word “πειρατής” (peiratēs) and this in turn from the verb “πειράομαι” (peiráomai), “I attempt”, which is a derivative of the noun “πείρα” (peîra), “experience”. Coming from the depths of the centuries, the word “pirate” took on another dimension in our days. The ruling classes saw pirates as rebels and hated them. Rebels without a state, they were not submissive to any law, except from the laws they instituted themselves, improvising together. This is the feeling of a Pirate: when something doesn’t work, you have to attempt to bring a new concept. Sometimes it goes beyond a certain point and perhaps exceeds certain limits, because it is an expression of challenge; the challenge to change the system. I’m a member of the Board (and former chairman) of Pirate Party of Greece, also a member of press team of PPGR, former journalist, now a free lancer. I'm in the team of Pirate Times from the start, I joined voluntarily and consciously because I am interested to meet pirates from around the world, to exchange views and spread the pirate spirit.

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